Author Archives: Lancashirepast.com

Newburgh Cross, near Lathom, West Lancashire

At the highest point of Newburgh village green stands Newburgh Cross. The cross itself is modern, but its socket base and steps are much older. Some sources have suggested a 17th-18th century date but others go as far as suggesting … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Wayside Crosses | Tagged , ,

Mount Pavilion, Fleetwood

Peter Hesketh of Rossall Hall sank his fortune into building the brand new town of Fleetwood, on a stretch of the deserted coast where the River Wyre meets the sea. He commissioned the architect Decimus Burton to design the layout … Continue reading

Posted in Victorian Lancashire | Tagged , | 1 Comment

St Leonard the Less Church, Samlesbury near Preston

The church of St Leonard the Less was originally built by Gospatric, lord of the manor of Samlesbury as a chapel-of-ease for his family and staff. Local tradition has it that he persuaded two visiting Irish bishops to consecrate a burial place by the church, … Continue reading

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Fleetwood’s Victorian Lighthouses

It was Peter Hesketh’s bold vision to create along an empty, wind swept shore the town of Fleetwood. It was to be a brand new Victorian holiday resort and seaport. He commissioned  Captain Henry Mangles Denham of the Royal Navy and the scientific Royal Society to design … Continue reading

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Fleetwood Museum Reopens

Some good news at last, following the regrettable decision to close so many of Lancashire’s Museums a couple of years ago. Fleetwood Maritime Museum, based in the old customs house in Fleetwood has reopened. Congratulations to all the volunteers and … Continue reading

Posted in Tudor Lancashire | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Lancaster’s Lost Roman Fort

On top of Castle Hill once stood Lancaster’s Roman Fort, or as we shall see, a succession of forts built over the years. Today on the site is the massive fortress of Lancaster Castle and the Medieval Priory Church. The top of … Continue reading

Posted in Roman Forts,, Roman Lancashire | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Worden Hall and Park, Leyland

The land at present day Worden Park was acquired by Henry Farington in 1534 and would stay with his family for over 400 years. The earliest hall on the site was called Shaw Hall and this is shown on a 1725 … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Lancashire, Victorian Lancashire | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

St George’s Hall, Liverpool

In early Victorian times Liverpool was in need of two new buildings- one for  an entertainment venue and another for  law courts. Two independent competitions were held to find an architect for these two schemes. Harry Lonsdale Elmes, a young architect, won both, quite a coup … Continue reading

Posted in Victorian Lancashire | Tagged ,

St Michaels on Wyre Church

St Michael’s Church is old enough to be mentioned in the Domesday Book as ‘Michelescherce’. Bounded by the River Wyre, it has been called St Michaels-on-Wyre since the 1100s. The earliest parts of the present building are Norman, as can be evidenced by the … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Oldest Churches,, Tudor Lancashire | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

St Helens Church, Churchtown near Garstang

The oval shaped graveyard of St Helens  is a key indicator that a  very early ‘Dark Ages’ Saxon church stood once in this place. The name  ‘Churchtown’ was at one time called Kirkland, with ‘kirk’ being the Viking word for a church.  The earliest parts of the present building … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Oldest Churches, | Tagged , , | 1 Comment