Category Archives: Tudor Lancashire

Broughton Tower, Broughton near Preston

Broughton Tower itself no longer stands, but surprisingly much of its moat remains at the site of this once fortified place. We’ll say a little more about how to see it (and it is quite extensive), but first a little history… The tower was … Continue reading

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Church Cottage Museum, Broughton near Preston

Today a small Tudor cottage stands next to Broughton Church and Primary School. It has had a long and varied history, but now functions as a museum and is open every Sunday afternoon. It was originally built in 1590 as a Fylde Three … Continue reading

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Rufford Old Hall, West Lancashire

The Heskeths received their estate and manor at Rufford by marrying into the Fitton family. Maud Fitton brought the land and title in the late 1200 and early 1300s. This was to be the Hesketh’s main powerbase, although they had … Continue reading

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Park Hill House : Pendle Heritage Centre, Barrowford

Sometime around 1450 John Bannister built a wooden hall at Park Hill. The Bannister family had two major divisions in Lancashire, one branch at Darwen and the other at Bretherton with their manor house of Bank Hall (see our webpage on … Continue reading

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Turton Tower, Chapeltown, Near Bolton

In the early 1400s a Pele tower was built on a high commanding spot in Turton. It was a three story rectangular defendable structure, with four foot thick walls and narrow windows. This was a turbulent time with the possibility of raiders coming down … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Pele Towers, Stuart Lancashire, Tudor Lancashire, Victorian Lancashire | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

Kersal Cell and Kersal Moor, Salford

Kersal Cell and Kersal Moor have long, interesting and sometimes intertwined histories. The moor today is a nature reserve and there is open access for visitors. The Kersal Cell building is now split into private houses, but good views of it can … Continue reading

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Towneley Hall, Burnley

The first hall was built at Towneley in 1380 and was a large open barn-like medieval building, similar to the ones still seen at Smithills in Bolton and Warton Old Rectory near Carnforth. Seventy years later the huge south wing with its very thick … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Lancashire, Historic Houses,, Medieval Lancashire, Stuart Lancashire, Tudor Lancashire, Victorian Lancashire | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

Stonyhurst Hall and College

Richard Shireburn inherited the estate at Stonyhurst in 1537. He decided to do away with most of the medieval buildings to construct a bigger, grander hall. He held important posts in the county- at various times he was a magistrate, … Continue reading

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Fleetwood Museum Reopens

Some good news at last, following the regrettable decision to close so many of Lancashire’s Museums a couple of years ago. Fleetwood Maritime Museum, based in the old customs house in Fleetwood has reopened. Congratulations to all the volunteers and … Continue reading

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St Michaels on Wyre Church

St Michael’s Church is old enough to be mentioned in the Domesday Book as ‘Michelescherce’. Bounded by the River Wyre, it has been called St Michaels-on-Wyre since the 1100s. The earliest parts of the present building are Norman, as can be evidenced by the … Continue reading

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