Category Archives: Medieval Lancashire

Robin Hood’s Well, Helmshore near Bury

On the Helmshore side of Holcombe Moor stands Robin Hood’s Well. It would have been a welcome place for pilgrims to rest and take a drink on their way to Whalley Abbey. This medieval route is marked by the nearby Pilgrims … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Wells,, Medieval Lancashire | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Turton Tower, Chapeltown, Near Bolton

In the early 1400s a Pele tower was built on a high commanding spot in Turton. It was a three story rectangular defendable structure, with four foot thick walls and narrow windows. This was a turbulent time with the possibility of raiders coming down … Continue reading

Posted in Castles,, Medieval Lancashire, Stuart Lancashire, Tudor Lancashire, Victorian Lancashire | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Kersal Cell and Kersal Moor, Salford

Kersal Cell and Kersal Moor have long, interesting and sometimes intertwined histories. The moor today is a nature reserve and there is open access for visitors. The Kersal Cell building is now split into private houses, but good views of it can … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Medieval Monasteries,, Tudor Lancashire | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Edisford Bridge, Clitheroe

Edisford Historic Bridge Continue reading

Posted in Bridges, Georgian Lancashire, Medieval Lancashire | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Towneley Hall, Burnley

The first hall was built at Towneley in 1380 and was a large open barn-like medieval building, similar to the ones still seen at Smithills in Bolton and Warton Old Rectory near Carnforth. Seventy years later the huge south wing with its very thick … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Lancashire, Historic Houses,, Medieval Lancashire, Stuart Lancashire, Tudor Lancashire, Victorian Lancashire | Tagged , , | 9 Comments

Hob Cross, Lathom, West Lancashire

The site of Hob Cross  would have dated back to Medieval times, and even possibly before. Hob is a word to describe a type of supernatural being that lived in the more remote areas of the countryside. In Lancashire a similar term might be … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Wayside Crosses | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Leyland Town Cross and Well

At the centre of the oldest part of Leyland stands the town cross and well. The cross shaft and steps are probably medieval and the well would have been a useful water source in the early days of the settlement. Leyland is one … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Wells,, Medieval Lancashire, Victorian Lancashire, Wayside Crosses | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Newburgh Cross, near Lathom, West Lancashire

At the highest point of Newburgh village green stands Newburgh Cross. The cross itself is modern, but its socket base and steps are much older. Some sources have suggested a 17th-18th century date but others go as far as suggesting … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Wayside Crosses | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

St Leonard the Less Church, Samlesbury near Preston

The church of St Leonard the Less was originally built by Gospatric, lord of the manor of Samlesbury as a chapel-of-ease for his family and staff. Local tradition has it that he persuaded two visiting Irish bishops to consecrate a burial place by the church, … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Oldest Churches, | Tagged , | 2 Comments

St Michaels on Wyre Church

St Michael’s Church is old enough to be mentioned in the Domesday Book as ‘Michelescherce’. Bounded by the River Wyre, it has been called St Michaels-on-Wyre since the 1100s. The earliest parts of the present building are Norman, as can be evidenced by the … Continue reading

Posted in Medieval Lancashire, Oldest Churches,, Tudor Lancashire | Tagged , , | 1 Comment